No More Page Three protest London

Gathering outside News International

On Saturday my boyfriend and I went along to a protest outside News International, the owners of The Sun, organised by No More Page Three and OBJECT.

It was protest against Page Three on the 42nd anniversary of its launch.

For anyone outside of the UK Page Three is feature found in some tabloid newspapers, like The Sun and The Daily Sport, where there’s a large photograph of a topless female glamour model on the third page of the paper (hence ‘Page Three’).

When we were there everyone signed a card to give to the editor of The Sun, Dominic Mohan. We did a bit of chanting and then the front of the card was revealed (see picture below).

We were all asked to ‘spot the difference’ between the two sides. Then some of the activists tried to deliver the card through the doors of The Sun. Security wouldn’t have it. One woman was hurt during the scuffle but seemed OK afterwards.

We did some more singing and chanting and then moved peacefully back to the pavement. This is when my boyf and I left to grab some food.

I’m gutted that we left early because after we went the police were called and ended up signing the petition. A policeman said they’d banned The Sun from the police station because it’s degrading to women and left a comment on the petition saying ‘women deserve respect from the media’. AMAZING.

East London Lines did a great report on it and you can sign the petition here.

Card for Dominic Mohan for page three’s 42nd birthday

Singing the card

Trying to deliver the card to The Sun

Feminist find #1 – Women’s march tea towel

Tea towel in the Suffragette colours

I’m going to start updating the blog more regularly starting with feminist finds. Whenever I find something super and feminist I’ll post.

First off – this tea towel. I want it on my dishes. It’s from the Radical Tea Towel company who make lefty tea towels, cards, notelets and aprons. I also love their Mahatma Ghandi one.

 

15 things…the Daily Mail taught me

I read the Daily Mail for six weeks (for research, that’s why there are scribblings on some) and here are the pearliest of the pearls of wisdom I found.

[Click on photos to enlarge]

1. Boys should be BOYS and avoid things that are ‘feminine’ so they aren’t called a girl.

2. That thing where I quite like the woman who gave birth to me, that, that’ll end in tears.

3. When (not ‘if’!) I get married I’m biologically programmed to dictate my husband’s eating habits.

4. Getting back in the kitchen will make everything better.

5. As well as the kitchen, dusting will make us feel better and show our men we love them.

6. We should be worried about “foreigners” getting life changing health care.

7. There was no point getting that degree.

8. If you’re a size 12 you’re obviously having too much fun and should stop it immediately. (I MUST BE HAVING SHIT LOADS OF FUN).

9. If you’re curvy your dress is hard working – not bejewelled and fabulous.

10. YOUR PARTNER’S (potential) INFIDELITY IS YOUR FAULT.

11. Feminism is about being ‘honest’ with ourselves and accepting the status quo.

12. Being a working mother is dangerous.

13. It’s OK to be a bigoted homophobe.

 14. Stuck in a dead-end marriage? GRIN AND BEAR IT.

15. Loads of, like ALL, career women feel like they shouldn’t be there.

Using ‘Ms’ is still a feminist issue

National Rail don't have a problem with women using Ms

“This will probably seem a bit silly.” That’s how I started the conversation with my bank manager in my hometown of Teignmouth that got me laughed out of his office.

“I want to change the name on my account from ‘Miss Cook’ to ‘Ms Cook’” I told him. At this point I expected him say “yes of course” and within a few clicks I would have the prefix on my bank statement that I use everywhere else. Instead he laughed. A lot. When he composed himself from the devastatingly witty joke he said, “You’re right. That does seem silly.”

My Caitlin Moran sexism alert was going off in my head. “This is sexism!” I thought. “And it’s happening to me.” Why does a bank manager in 2012 find a woman wanting to change her prefix funny? This should be an every day occurrence. I was under the illusion that Ms was the default honorific for women. Perhaps I just read too much of the Guardian, which in their style guide says, “use Ms for women subsequently unless they have expressed a preference for Miss or Mrs”. Well if the Guardian would call me Ms why are you laughing MR bank manager?

I tried to explain to him why I wanted to change it. It was simply because men are called ‘Mr’ their whole lives and I wanted to have a prefix I could use in the same way. Pretty logical I thought.

“But ‘Ms’ is for divorced women. Are you divorced?” – he thought he had me there. “No I’m not but I know lots of women who choose Ms.” He laughed again and dismissed me. I thanked him for his time and stormed out of the office in true Apprentice boardroom style.

I was riled. But I do get that on the scale of women’s rights issues it hardly even deserves a place. Being called ‘Miss’ or ‘Mrs’ is not something that’s going to make the pay gap widen, cause the conviction rate for rapists to lower or fuel street harassment. I was still annoyed though. I was at the bank anyway opening a savings account and it would have taken one minute.

When I went in the next week to cash a cheque, I asked the woman behind the counter to change the ‘Miss’ and she left the manager a message asking him to change it. He never did. By this point it was less about wanting to have a prefix and a name I could keep for my entire life – Ms Chloe Cook does have a certain ring to it – but more about the point that bank staff refused a customer’s request because it was a feminist issue.

The inevitable time came when I ran out of money for baked beans and vodka and needed to extend my student overdraft. I went into the meeting determined not to take no for an answer. That conversation ended, Me–“So you won’t change it?”. Him–“No.”

It turns out Bournemouth, where I go to university, is a pretty good place for gender equality. After all the trouble with the bank back in Devon a clerk behind the counter changed it within minutes. “They really wouldn’t change it?” she said. “That seems silly.”

Written for The People’s Republic of South Devon.

Meet the Feminist Beauty Queen

As part of a project about beauty pageants I’ve been working on for university I spoke to one pageant winner who takes women’s rights seriously. Clara Belle is Miss Durham 2011 and a feminist.

Read the article here.

I personally do not agree with her take on feminism as you will probably have guessed from this post but it was really interesting to talk to her. She spoke a lot about what I’ve started calling “individualist feminism” because that’s the only way I can describe it. She says it’s about “doing what you want to whether or not it promotes equality between the sexes. It’s individualism as well as feminism.”

“I’m not damaging. I know I’m part of an industry that could potentially be seen to be damaging. But I personally am not”, she says.

This kind of thinking is alien to me as feminism in my eyes is about making change for the whole global community. Women and men are not equal and so we can’t justify doing these kind of competitions.

I could see the argument for pageants in the UK if women, like Clara with a degree and drive, had the same chance of getting a place in the cabinet or editing a newspaper as a man of the same age, with the same degree and the same ambition. Only then can they be seen as ‘harmless fun’.

I will write a bit more about my experience of watching a pageant and how it is still a cattle market within the next couple of weeks.

Much love,

Chloe

x

Podcast: Are modern Beauty Pageants degrading?

Protests outside the Miss World finals last November reignited fierce debate in the feminist community – with some women calling beauty pageants ‘empowering’ and others ‘degrading’.

As Miss England regional heats take place up and down the country, I talk to two opposing feminist activists and discuss whether the traditional feminist view is outdated.

Correction: When I say there is a ‘swimwear round’ in Miss England I meant to say ‘sportswear round‘.

Dorset police rape campaign totally misses the mark

One of the scaremongering campaign posters

Written for The Bournemouth Rock newspaper.

Trigger warning: discussion of rape and sexual assault.

Unless you’re a final year student stuck in limbo between the library and your semi-detached in Winton you will have seen the yellow triangles plastered around Bournemouth town centre. They are warning signs reminding us women to keep safe at night. Operation Protect, a campaign ran by Dorset Police, has been linked to the 50% drop in alcohol fuelled sex offences in Bournemouth, as well as winning a national policing award. Maybe there’s no denying that fall in rates and the campaign are linked, but there are still major drawbacks to its methods.

At first glance the main message is neither revolutionary nor controversial. Most of the posters emphasise the importance of getting home safely and knowing your limits – sound advice for everyday living. Two posters however, are misinformed and scaremongering. One of them shows cartoon stick figures captioned, “we met, he bought me a drink, we danced, he raped me”. It suggests that every man a woman ‘dares’ to dance with or accepts a drink from will sexually assault her. Both posters then state, “In most rape cases women know their attacker.” This is true, but Dorset Police have failed to put this in the right context. Most victims know their attackers because almost half of all rapes occur within relationships.

According to statistics by the Home Office about victim and perpetrator relationships, in the majority of all rapes reported the perpetrator and victim are partners at the time of attack. Ex-partners, dates and ‘other intimates’, meaning family members and close friends, commit a further 40%. Strangers account for 11% of attacks and 16% of rapes reported are perpetrated by acquaintances.

Nothing is factually wrong with what the posters are saying. But thanks to skewed media reporting the general public has an idea that rapes are committed by strangers hiding in bushes. Now the police are telling us that most of our male friends are waiting for their opportunity to attack. So us women have to now look out for strangers in bushes and male friends, acquaintances, doctors, lecturers, our hairdressers, that bloke we met at that party once and thought was alright – anyone who we already know. By saying that most rape victims know their attackers without explaining why is irresponsible. Not to mention that it paints all men out to be sexually violent.

The thing that angers me the most is that they had a chance to do something different. The whole campaign focuses on women making the right choices to prevent themselves from being raped and barely touches on telling rapists not to rape. Only in sexually violent crimes do people blame the victim. I could cover up head to foot in a bin liner, stop drinking alcohol and even stop flirting with men unless I wanted to have sex with them within the next half an hour and if I was raped someone, somewhere would still say it was my fault. That’s the kind of attitude rape victims have to deal with everyday and the police should be the first people to try and stop this, not fuel it.

Original article in the Bournemouth Rock page 11